Related Links

Related Stories

News

The Essential Element unveils the Hydra water purifier

The fuel cell-based device turns scum into more than 20,000 gallons of pure water per day, makes medical-grade oxygen and runs on the sun.

The Hydra’s mobile solar/hydrogen fuel cells use light-weight, low-power components and very fine water filters. The water purifier from Essential Element is designed for use at medical clinics, schools, remote communities and disaster relief agencies.
 

Brad Carlson, COO of The Essential Element, which is commercializing the HYDRA, said: “What we’re doing is using the sun to break water into hydrogen and oxygen, saving the oxygen for medical uses and using the hydrogen to power the fuel cell, which provides the energy to run the water purification system. So it’s fully self-contained, needs no outside sources of power, and can be delivered to any point on the globe.”
 

Carlson said the HYDRA can be flown in by helicopter, dropped by parachute, or delivered on the back of a pickup truck. “It also gives water purification levels that are much purer, much cleaner than any other available, so one of the beauties of this unit is that it can provide virus-free, bacteria-free drinking water in disaster relief areas.”
 

Share this article

More services

 

This article is featured in:
Cleaning & Purification  •  Distribution & Supply

 

Comments

Fco said

09 June 2010
It is very interesting. We would try to develpe some disaster zone´s purification plants, with a very small foot print, moved by helicopters.
Please send to us prices,. The flow target, is 50 m³/d. We are actually usinng UF, and your cells seems to be the answer to the energy supply, to minimaze the foot print, eliminating conventionla energy plants. We need
1-3kw, to operate.

Fco said

09 June 2010
It is very interesting. We would try to develpe some disaster zone´s purification plants, with a very small foot print, moved by helicopters.
Please send to us prices,. The flow target, is 50 m³/d

Note: The majority of comments posted are created by members of the public. The views expressed are theirs and unless specifically stated are not those Elsevier Ltd. We are not responsible for any content posted by members of the public or content of any third party sites that are accessible through this site. Any links to third party websites from this website do not amount to any endorsement of that site by the Elsevier Ltd and any use of that site by you is at your own risk. For further information, please refer to our Terms & Conditions.

Comment on this article

You must be registered and logged in to leave a comment about this article.